Photo of David Urban

David Urban represents organizations in all aspects of labor and employment law. He has successfully defended employers in cases involving alleged discrimination and retaliation, disability, medical leave, privacy, trade secrets, and alleged violation of wage and hour laws such as the Fair Labor Standards Act ("FLSA") and California's Wage Orders and meal and rest break laws. He has successfully represented government agencies in lawsuits alleging deprivation of constitutional rights, including lawsuits under 42 U.S.C. section 1983.

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The year 2015 will likely be a stand-out year for new developments in First Amendment law.  The end of this year has seen free speech at the top of the news on a near-daily basis.  Protests of police department practices, sparked by events in Ferguson, Missouri and New York City, swept the country

Breaking-News1.jpgOn Thursday, June 19, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court in Lane v. Franks held that the First Amendment protects a public employee who provides truthful sworn testimony, compelled by subpoena, outside the scope of his or her ordinary job responsibilities.  In so holding, the Court overturned precedent from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the

Breaking-News1.jpgThis blog post was written by David Urban and Shardé C. Thomas

Today the California Supreme Court issued a 6-1 decision in Long Beach Police Officers Association v. City of Long Beach.  The case involves the issue of whether police departments are required in response to California Public Records Act (“CPRA”) requests to disclose

LockersMany student discipline matters in public schools involve speech, be it joking threats by the student, outrageous bullying on social media, epithets or hate speech, or clothing containing messages or symbols that violate school rules.  Because they involve speech, these discipline cases can raise substantial First Amendment concerns.

Some view student speech as less valuable

Iconic CollumnsThe year 2014 will bring important developments in a number of areas of free speech law in employment and education.  The following are five primary areas worth following in the next 12 months:

1.  Anti-SLAPP Motions Creatively Invoked by Public Employers and Educators:

December 2013 saw a surprising new case in the context of anti-SLAPP

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On Wednesday, August 21, 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held in Dahlia v. Rodriguez that a Burbank police detective could assert a First Amendment retaliation claim based on his allegedly having complained to authorities about abusive interrogation tactics at his department.  The case is significant because it expressly overturns a