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Megan Lewis represents public employers, including cities, counties, special districts, and private school clients on employment law issues.  Megan is an accomplished litigator with over a decade of litigation experience before state and federal courts, administrative bodies, and in private arbitrations.  She is experienced in all aspects of the litigation process, including pleadings, written discovery and depositions, dispositive motion practice, alternative dispute resolution and trial.  Megan defends employers on the full array of employment law matters, including cases involving alleged violations of Title VII, the Fair Employment and Housing Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the California and United States Constitutions, and tort claims.  She also provides advice and counsel to the firm’s clients on diverse employment and labor law matters such as employee leave issues, discipline, and anti-discrimination, harassment, and retaliation laws.

It’s no secret that it can be a challenge for employees to balance work and family obligations.  One measure taken by the California legislature to increase work/life balance is the establishment of school activity leave under section 230.8 of the California Labor Code.  Below are answers to employers’ most frequently asked questions regarding this lesser-known

This post was authored by Megan Lewis.

California law has long-surpassed federal law in the area of lactation accommodation in the workplace. Senate Bill 937 (“SB 937”), if it is approved by Governor Brown, would go even further to protect the rights of employees who need to express breastmilk at work.  This new legislation would

This post was authored by Megan Lewis.

Since recreational marijuana was legalized in 2016, many have assumed that employment protections for marijuana users would likely expand, either via legislation or though litigation.

We are already seeing small steps in that direction. For instance, San Francisco recently amended its ban-the-box ordinance to, among other things,

This blog was authored by Megan Lewis.

Earlier this month, in Perez v. City of Roseville, the U.S. Court of Appeals held that terminating a police officer for engaging in an off-duty, extramarital affair with a co-worker could violate the officer’s right to privacy under the U.S. Constitution.

Background Facts

Perez, a probationary police

In Douglas v. Xerox Business Services, the Ninth Circuit became the latest circuit to rule that employers should look at the workweek as a whole to determine compliance with the minimum-wage provision of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  This result has also been adopted by Second, Fourth, Eighth, and D.C. Circuits, and is reflective