"Public Employment Relations Board"

On July 15, 2019, the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) issued a decision in the case,  Association of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs v. County of Orange, PERB Decision No. 2675-M.  At issue in the case was whether PERB has jurisdiction to hear claims brought by employee organizations that represent peace officers as that

Violent and tragic events in Charlottesville, and the intense national debate that followed, have put the issue of hate speech at the forefront of the public’s attention.  A number of publications have addressed the issue of when a private employer can discharge an employee who, on the employee’s own time, participates in organized hate speech. 

This guest post was authored by Connie C. Almond

Gavel and Books.JPGThe Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) recently published proposed regulations to implement AB 646 (Chapter 680, Statutes of 2011), which requires factfinding in bargaining disputes under the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act (MMBA).  PERB is accepting written comments regarding the proposed regulations through June 12, and will hold a

This guest post was authored by Bruce A. Barsook


Yesterday (December 8), the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) adopted proposed emergency regulations to implement AB 646 (Chapter 680, Statutes of 2011), the recently enacted legislation requiring factfinding in bargaining disputes under the MMBA.  The emergency rulemaking package now will be submitted to the Office of

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) is the federal counterpart of the Public Employees Relation Board (“PERB”). The NLRB is the body that oversees the administration of federal labor law, and PERB is the body that oversees the administration of California labor law.

Recently, the NLRB prosecuted a complaint brought by its Connecticut regional office

Two recent developments in California law involving the layoff of public employees have raised questions:

  • First, the California Supreme Court decided that public employers are not required to negotiate with their employees’ unions about the decision to lay off employees.
  • Second, a Superior Court judge in Los Angeles approved the settlement of a lawsuit between