Employment-Application.pngThe National Football League’s handling of several recent high-profile domestic violence incidents involving players Ray Rice, Greg Hardy and Jonathan Dwyer has raised the national consciousness regarding how employers handle domestic violence issues. Domestic violence has been, and continues to be, a prevalent problem that creates many challenging issues for employers.  A recent Centers for

AnotherGavel.jpgIt pays to read statutes carefully. Many statutes authorizing lawsuits for employment discrimination allow an award of attorney’s fees to the prevailing party. Almost uniformly, these statutes have been construed as authorizing an award of attorney’s fees to a prevailing plaintiff as a matter of course but only to a prevailing defendant when the lawsuit

Mother with Baby.jpgAs part of its Strategic Enforcement Plan for 2012-2016 (“the SEP”), the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) identified the following five priorities for national enforcement in the private and federal, state and local government sectors:

1. Eliminating systemic barriers to recruitment and hiring;

2. Protecting vulnerable workecombatrs such as immigrants and migrants;

3. Targeting

Determining what constitutes an “adverse employment action” is critical when an employee sues for retaliation and/or discrimination.  In order to be able to sustain a claim for either retaliation or discrimination, an employee must sufficiently prove that he/she suffered an adverse employment action.  This issue was recently addressed by the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of

Children-Fighting.pngDoes it ever feel like managing the workplace can be like keeping the peace between children fighting in the back seat of the family car?  This was the feeling in a recent out-of-state case where a Court held that an employer was not liable for the alleged hostile work environment created amongst bickering co-workers or

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Thompson v. North American Stainless has caused some commentators to sound the alarm warning employers of employee friendly courts and impending lawsuits as a result of the decision.  Hans Bader of the Washington Examiner wrote that the Thompson decision shows the Supreme Court is not pro-business.  Tim Gould of