Photo of Stefanie K. Vaudreuil

Stefanie Vaudreuil has spent her legal career providing counsel and advice to and litigating on behalf of public agencies, including fire departments/districts, law enforcement, cities, counties, special districts, school districts, charter schools, community colleges, and county offices of education.  Stefanie also is experienced in advising and representing independent schools. Stefanie, the daughter of a retired fire marshal, has a special interest in working with fire departments and districts.  She understands and appreciates the unique culture that is the fire service.

This post was authored by Stefanie K. Vaudreuil.

With all the possible leaves of absence that may be available to employees, ensuring consistent and accurate application of the applicable laws relating to leaves can be one of the more daunting tasks for employers. In a recent survey conducted by the Disability Management Employer Coalition

This post was authored by Stefanie K. Vaudreuil.

Keeping track of monikers for the generations since World War II can be puzzling.  You have Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials, but the Millennials are also known as Generation Y.  Just who are these Millennials?  They were born in the 80s—enough said.  The Millennials have

This post was authored by Stefanie K. Vaudreuil.

It’s time to check your policies. New DFEH regulations (California Code of Regulations, title 2, sections 11027.1 and 11028) went into effect on July 1, 2018 that provide definitions on “national origin” and “undocumented applicant or employee,” in addition to outlining specific employment practices regarding language

It is that time again. These are actual employment cases.  Really, they are.

Mad at your co-workers? Tell a friend, not Facebook

Jayne Brill sued her former employer and the Virginia Employment Commission because she was terminated and denied unemployment benefits. Brill was alleged to have violated the company’s social media policy when she made

Often times, an employee may know that discipline or a poor performance evaluation is imminent. Occasionally, such an employee will engage in a preemptive strike—“You can’t discipline me or give me a poor performance evaluation now since I have submitted a complaint.” While this may not necessarily be the norm, it is also not unheard

Fire JacketIn 2007, the Firefighters Procedural Bill of Rights Act (FBOR) was enacted after several years of unsuccessful attempts to pass similar legislation. Although the FBOR is modeled after the longstanding Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights Act (POBR) [Gov. Code, §§ 3300 et seq.], that statutory scheme, which was originally intended for peace officers,