Authors: Alysha Stein-Manes and Nathan J. Price

You’ve probably heard the term “Skelly” meeting or conference hundreds, if not thousands of times, but what does “Skelly” really mean?  Even if you think you know, a refresher can’t hurt, right?!

Most California public employees have what is known as a constitutionally

The past two years have challenged employers’ resilience and adaptability in our rapidly-changing workplaces.  One such change was the explosion of remote work, which swept across workplaces throughout the country and in some cases, landed a permanent position at the hiring table.  As employers adapt to the increasing prevalence of remote work, one important question

This Blog post was authored by Lisa Charbonneau

This post appeared in June 2015.  It has been reviewed and is up to date.

Many schools, colleges, and municipalities operate special programs and camps during the summer months.  Staffing these programs and camps frequently involves hiring temporary or “seasonal” personnel, such as lifeguards, camp

This post appeared in August 2016.  It has been reviewed and is up to date.

CalPERS issued a Circular Letter on July 12, 2016, which provided information on its compliance review process and its most common findings, including employing retired annuitants.  In our practice, we have also observed some confusion surrounding the specifics on

The Fair Employment and Housing Act (the FEHA) provides employees with legal protection from harassment, discrimination and retaliation. The Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) is the California agency that oversees and enforces the FEHA. As part of its oversight role, DFEH issues guidance to employers to assist in compliance with the FEHA requirements.

This week, the California Legislature is considering the adoption of Assembly Bill (“AB”) 84, which would reauthorize COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (“SPSL”). If passed, the bill would require that most employers in the state provide paid sick leave to employees for certain reasons related to COVID-19.

Earlier this week, the State Senate adopted AB

The start of the New Year brought with it a new wave of labor and employment legislation that employers should note, including changes to many existing laws. In this blog we’ve summarized a few key new changes that went into effect on January 1, 2022.

1. SB 3: Minimum Wage Increase

The final step increase

Since the COVID-19 pandemic first began, it has had a multitude of evolving impacts on the operation of the workplace.  One impact is the increased number of requests employers are receiving from employees for reasonable accommodations.  These increases are attributed to various factors, which have evolved as the pandemic has progressed.  At the outset of

Over the last several years, virtually all levels of government have increasingly recognized the critical link between building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive workplace and effectively meeting the needs of the communities they serve—in particular, historically underserved and marginalized communities.

At the federal level, the Biden Administration has issued several Executive Orders that recognize the