Note: This is the second of a two-part series concerning federal unemployment assistance. You may access the first bulletin here.

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) into law. Under that Act, the federal government established several programs to expand unemployment assistance to

Employees who are eligible for Emergency Paid Sick Leave (“EPSL”) under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) may also file a claim for Paid Family Leave (“PFL”), a benefit established under California law. PFL provides 60-70% wage replacement benefits for up to 6 weeks (8 weeks effective July 1, 2020) in a 12-month period

On March 19, 2020, Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-33-20 (“Order”), which effectively imposed a statewide shutdown of non-essential business and governmental operations.  This Special Bulletin was updated on April 6 to reflect the most current guidance and orders.

The analysis provided in this Bulletin relies on an interpretation of the term “essential”

On March 27, President Trump signed into law HR 748, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act, which provides for $2 trillion in relief assistance to businesses, non-profits, state and local governments, public agencies and special districts, public elementary and secondary schools, institutions of higher education, and individuals.

The Act includes numerous provisions

On March 18, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and in an effort to reduce the impact of the virus on American families, the Senate passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the Act) and President Trump signed the bill into law a few hours later.  The law will go into effect

On March 14, 2020, at 12:51 am, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and in an effort to reduce the impact of the virus on American families, the House of Representative passed H.R. 6201, titled the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the Act).  The bill will now move to the Senate, where it will be

On December 12, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced a Final Rule that clarifies and amends federal regulations concerning the regular rate of pay under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  Many of the affected regulations date back more than 60 years, long before the FLSA was made applicable to the public sector.  

Today, September 24, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced a final rule modifying the weekly salary and annual compensation threshold levels for white collar exemptions to Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime requirements. The final rule will become effective on January 1, 2020.  It is critical for employers to become familiar with the

This blog post was reviewed in September 2019 to provide the most up-to-date legal information.

This principle used to be clear – paid administrative leave was outside the scope of adverse employment action.  This was based on court holdings that an employee suffers no substantial or material change in terms and conditions of employment while