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Elizabeth Arce is an experienced litigator who is licensed to practice law in California and New York. Her background includes litigating labor and employment cases in both state and federal court, as well as before administrative agencies including the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing. Elizabeth has successfully represented employers in various employment matters ranging from single plaintiff lawsuits to wage and hour class and collective actions. Her litigation experience includes numerous successful summary judgment motions, defeating class certification, and decertifying collective actions. Elizabeth's litigation practice also includes preparation of appellate briefs in both state and federal appellate courts.

In the corporate world, the practice of giving annual performance reviews to employees has come under attack in recent years.  Leading business magazines and newspapers have printed articles advocating for the elimination of performance evaluations.  There are even books in the marketplace that teach companies how to get rid of performance reviews.  Among the reasons

ClipboardIn the corporate world, the practice of giving annual performance reviews to employees is under attack.  Leading business magazines and newspapers have printed articles advocating for the elimination of performance evaluations.  There are even books in the marketplace that teach companies how to get rid of performance reviews.  Among the reasons for eliminating annual evaluations

truckMany public agencies supplement their workforce with independent contractors.  Since independent contractors who perform services are not employees, agencies do not have to pay them according to the requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). If the contractor does not meet the qualifications for “independent contractor” status, the worker must be treated as an

EEOC SealThe EEOC issued two informal discussion letters critiquing policies and forms used by unidentified public employers when making disability related inquiries of employees.  Although informal discussion letters are not “official” EEOC opinions, they provide guidance on an employer’s legal obligations.  In these informal letters, the EEOC reviewed the agencies’ fitness for duty exam forms and

Businesswoman on Videoconference with BusinessmanThis was the very question the U.S. Court of Appeals in Ohio was asked to consider in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Ford Motor Company.  The issue in this case is whether a telecommuting arrangement could be a reasonable accommodation for an employee suffering from a debilitating disability.  In a 2-1 split opinion, the

Las Vegas SignThe FMLA provides an eligible employee the right to 12 workweeks of leave to care for the employee’s spouse, child or parent with a serious health condition.  Consequently, employers generally grant employee requests to use FMLA leave when their family member receives medical treatment or undergoes a surgical procedure.  What happens when an employee requests

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It’s that time of year again to reflect on this year’s achievements and set goals for the new year.  With the beginning of 2014 upon us, we encourage personnel and human resources directors, managers and 

1.  Evaluate Your Agency’s Handling of Disability-Related Issues

Employee disability-related issues are among the most complicated and confusing that employers