Photo of David Urban

David Urban represents organizations in all aspects of labor and employment law. He has successfully defended employers in cases involving alleged discrimination and retaliation, disability, medical leave, privacy, trade secrets, and alleged violation of wage and hour laws such as the Fair Labor Standards Act ("FLSA") and California's Wage Orders and meal and rest break laws. He has successfully represented government agencies in lawsuits alleging deprivation of constitutional rights, including lawsuits under 42 U.S.C. section 1983.

This post was authored by David Urban

Cities, counties, special districts, public educators, and other government entities who invite public comment and contribution on their Twitter accounts, Facebook pages, websites, or other spaces on the internet might face liability for violating the First Amendment if they remove content posted by members of the public

The post was authored by David Urban.

Controversies over free speech, disruptive protests, sharp debates among faculty, withdrawal of invitations to controversial speakers, and interference with rights of expression happen just as much at private as at public colleges and universities. The difference, however, is that the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution binds

This post was authored by David Urban.

The stock market is at all-time highs, and unemployment and inflation are low. For many California public sector employers, the strengthened economy means more hiring.  Although this is good news, the hiring process does carry legal risks, just as did downsizing and other similar matters in bad

Violent and tragic events in Charlottesville, and the intense national debate that followed, have put the issue of hate speech at the forefront of the public’s attention.  A number of publications have addressed the issue of when a private employer can discharge an employee who, on the employee’s own time, participates in organized hate speech. 

Judge 2Many times, parties to a lawsuit receive trial court rulings in the midst of the litigation that are unfavorable, oppressive, and seem to them to be demonstrably wrong.  The parties want to appeal immediately, but their counsel will say that cannot happen, citing the “Final Judgment Rule.”  The rule certainly sounds dark and fateful.  Perhaps

College-campus-from-aboveOne of the most contentious issues in higher education continues to be how to punish and deter student-to-student sexual assault, protect students and assault survivors, and at the same time fully honor the legal rights of all concerned.  Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits institutions of higher education from discriminating “on the

2A couple of years ago we blogged about Amicus Curiae briefs, their role in the appellate law, and how they can benefit California’s employers. Since our original post, we witnessed a number of cases in which Amicus Curiae briefs played a significant role in landmark cases.  Such briefs continue to be an important way for