On October 18, 2017, the California Supreme Court denied review of Santa Ana Police Officers Association, et al. v. City of Santa Ana et al., a decision from the Fourth District Court of Appeal involving information (sometimes referred to as “discovery”) that must be provided to a law enforcement officer in connection with a disciplinary

This post was authored by Amit Katzir

Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review Janus v. AFSCME, a case out of Illinois challenging the constitutionality of mandatory agency shop fees for public employees.  Illinois, like California, is one of several states where agency shop arrangements are authorized in the public sector.

Under

In April, we reported on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, which held that sex-discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act includes discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.  Like the California federal trial court in Videckis v. Pepperdine University, the

This post was authored by Kristin D. Lindgren

Intro

Employers are well aware that employee disabilities can create mine fields due to the technical nature of disability discrimination laws.  Even the most well-intentioned employers can run into trouble.  But, what happens when the employer has recommended discipline of an employee, and the employee informs the

Judge 2Many times, parties to a lawsuit receive trial court rulings in the midst of the litigation that are unfavorable, oppressive, and seem to them to be demonstrably wrong.  The parties want to appeal immediately, but their counsel will say that cannot happen, citing the “Final Judgment Rule.”  The rule certainly sounds dark and fateful.  Perhaps

2A couple of years ago we blogged about Amicus Curiae briefs, their role in the appellate law, and how they can benefit California’s employers. Since our original post, we witnessed a number of cases in which Amicus Curiae briefs played a significant role in landmark cases.  Such briefs continue to be an important way for

US Supreme Court_2.jpgPublic agency officials and employees may read newspaper articles about recently decided landmark cases in public sector labor and employment law, and may feel relief, anger, surprise, or vindication in the result.  This is especially true if the decision impacts how the agency functions on a day-to-day basis.  These same individuals may also find developing