Photo of Lisa S. Charbonneau

Lisa represents and advises Liebert Cassidy Whitmore clients in all matters pertaining to labor and employment law. She represents LCW clients in employment litigation throughout the state and advises clients on issues ranging from state and federal wage and hour law compliance to the interactive process to the mandates of the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act.

Lisa has appeared in state and federal courts throughout the Bay Area, as well as before the California Labor Commissioner, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Prior to joining LCW, Ms. Charbonneau represented private employers and public and private employees in litigation matters ranging from wage and hour class actions to public employee dismissal proceedings to individual discrimination lawsuits.

Lisa received her JD from U.C. Hastings College of the Law in 2006 and was admitted to the California State Bar in December of that year. While at Hastings, Lisa served as an Equal Justice America fellow and received a grant to work on community economic development issues for the City of Detroit. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Government from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and soon after that worked at a political magazine, The American Prospect, until she began to pursue her law degree.

Lisa was recognized as a "Rising Star" by Northern California Super Lawyers in 2012, 2013 and 2014, and in 2010 received a Community Partner Award for pro bono work with the Transgender Law Center in San Francisco, California. She is a member of the California State Bar's Litigation Section and Women Lawyers of Alameda County.

This post was authored by Lisa S. Charbonneau.

On February 25, 2019, the California Second Appellate District Court of Appeal issued a decision in the case Marquez, et al. v. City of Long Beach, holding that the state minimum wage applies to charter cities because minimum wages are a matter of statewide concern. 

This post was authored by Lisa S. Charbonneau.

Under Article XI, Sections 4 and 5 of the California Constitution, charter cities and counties have exclusive authority to regulate and determine their own municipal affairs, free from intrusion by the state.  These provisions of the Constitution are collectively referred to as the municipal affairs clause

This post was authored by Lisa S. Charbonneau.

Many employers struggle with properly paying non-exempt employees who attend courses, conferences, seminars, meetings, and other trainings. In the absence of labor agreement provisions or other agency rules or policies governing this issue, public agency employers must follow the rules of the Fair Labor Standards Act

The post was authored by Lisa S. Charbonneau.

On March 5, 2018, the California Supreme Court issued a decision in the case Alvarado v. Dart Container Corporation, in which employee Hector Alvarado sued his employer under the California Labor Code for back overtime compensation under the theory that his employer had incorrectly calculated

On October 18, 2017, the California Supreme Court denied review of Santa Ana Police Officers Association, et al. v. City of Santa Ana et al., a decision from the Fourth District Court of Appeal involving information (sometimes referred to as “discovery”) that must be provided to a law enforcement officer in connection with a disciplinary