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Alex has spent his career working for and with public agencies. He is a member of the firm’s Labor Relations practice group and has broad and deep experience working with a wide range of collective bargaining statutes, including the National Labor Relation Act (“NLRA”) and the Meyers-Milias-Brown-Act (“MMBA”). Alex is well-versed in bargaining strategy and tactics and negotiates collective bargaining agreements with employee organizations and Project Labor Agreements (“PLAs”) with building and construction trades councils. When he is not bargaining, Alex regularly provides advice and counsel to clients navigating meet and confer obligations and in administrative proceedings defending clients against unfair practice charges and in arbitrations defending clients against contractual grievances.

On June 8, 2022, the California Department of Public Health (“CDPH”) adopted new definitions for two terms that are critical to determining how employers must respond to COVID-19 cases in the workplace: “close contact” and “infectious period.”[1]

The updated definitions will affect employer obligations under both CDPH health orders that use such terms and

This post originally appeared in January 2022.

In light of the current surge in COVID-19 cases, it is important that employers understand their obligations in the event that there is a COVID-19 outbreak at one of their workplaces.

This blog post is intended to provide an overview of the various statutory and regulatory obligations

On February 28, 2022, the California Department of Public Health (“CDPH”) updated its guidance concerning the use of face coverings to further relax those requirements.

While the updated CDPH guidance continues to require the use of face covering in certain high-risk settings,[1] the guidance removes those requirements in most other circumstances:

  • Effective March 1,

On February 9, 2022, Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill (“SB”) 114[1] into law. The law reauthorizes COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (“SPSL”), providing paid leave entitlements to employees who are unable to work or telework due to a number of qualifying reasons related to COVID-19. The law becomes effective on February 19, 2022 and

This week, the California Legislature is considering the adoption of Assembly Bill (“AB”) 84, which would reauthorize COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (“SPSL”). If passed, the bill would require that most employers in the state provide paid sick leave to employees for certain reasons related to COVID-19.

Earlier this week, the State Senate adopted AB

In light of the current surge in COVID-19 cases, it is important that employers understand their obligations in the event that there is a COVID-19 outbreak at one of their workplaces.

This blog post is intended to provide an overview of the various statutory and regulatory obligations that employers have during an outbreak so that

Under updated guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health (“CDPH”),[1] certain asymptomatic unvaccinated employees who have had a close contact exposure[2] to someone with COVID-19 may end their quarantine and return to work seven (7) days after the exposure as opposed to ten (10) days.

The CDPH guidance provides that

Over the last several months, mandatory vaccination requirements took center stage in the public response to COVID-19, but with the play getting underway and vaccination requirements becoming operative, it is the request for religious accommodation (i.e., exemption from vaccination requirements) that may be stealing the show.

Title VII and FEHA Set the Stage

On Monday, May 10, the Treasury Department issued the Interim Final Rule (Rule) concerning the operation of the Coronavirus Local Fiscal Recovery (CLFR) Fund[1] and opened the portal through which qualified governmental entities, including metropolitan cities[2] and counties[3], may apply to Treasury for the direct payment of such funds.

Note: In our April 16 Special

On January 8, the Department of Occupational and Safety (Cal/OSHA) updated its interpretive guidance concerning emergency COVID-19 regulations that took effect on November 30, 2020. The guidance reflects new information concerning employer obligations and employee entitlements under both Title 8 Sections 3205 and 3205.1, which, respectively, relate to the COVID-19 Prevention Program (CPP)[1] and workplace