Photo of Alysha Stein-Manes

Alysha Stein-Manes provides representation and counsel to LCW clients in all matters pertaining to labor, employment, and education law.  Alysha primarily works as a litigator, representing public agencies and non-profit educational institutions at all levels of the litigation process in state and federal court and before administrative bodies.  Her litigation practice includes all aspects of discovery, motion practice, and trial preparation, including deposition preparation and appearances, drafting demurrers and motions for summary judgment, and preparing pretrial motions and witnesses for trial.  Alysha is developing expertise in the retirement and health arenas and regularly provides advice and counsel in the area of the Affordable Care Act, as well as retirement law for CalPERS, CalSTRS and ’37 Act agencies.  She also represents agencies in CalPERS appeals before the Office of Administrative Hearings.

Over the last several years, the California Courts of Appeal have addressed questions regarding the California State Teachers’ Retirement System’s (CalSTRS) ability to collect overpayments of monthly retirement benefits paid to retirees because of, among other things, miscalculations of the retirees’ compensation earnable.  A Court of Appeal handed down the most recent case,   Blaser v.

This post was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes and Daniel Seitz

Remote surveillance is an area of expanding interest for law enforcement agencies.  Police departments continue to equip their sworn officers with body-mounted video cameras (“body cams”), and, in California, the Legislature has begun to regulate discoverability of body cam footage.  Agencies in California and across

This blog was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes.

April 1, 2020, is national Census Day and will kick off a year-long process of counting every resident in the United States.  In California, the California Citizens Redistricting Commission (the “Commission”), a non-partisan commission comprised of democratic, republican and independent (decline-to-state or no party preference) voters, is

This blog was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes.

On October 1, 2017, several peace officers from the Orange County Sheriff’s Department were in attendance at the 91 Harvest Music Festival when a gunman opened fire on the crowd.  Fifty-eight people were killed and over 800 injured.  Several of these peace officers brought other festivalgoers to

This blog was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes.

The manner in which institutions of higher education must address sexual assault in the educational context continues to evolve as both the federal government and courts weigh in on what procedures public and private colleges and universities must follow in order to comply with both Title IX

Last year, California voters passed Proposition 64 (“Prop 64”), making the recreational use and sale of marijuana generally permissible under California law.  Specifically, Prop 64 legalizes the use of marijuana for non-medical reasons by adults age 21 and over.  While Prop 64 made the use of recreational marijuana legal under state law as of

This post was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes and Jenny Denny

On October 15, 2017 Governor Brown vetoed Senate Bill (SB) 169, a bill that would have codified into state law federal Title IX regulations and recently-repealed guidance on sexual assault and sexual violence issued by the U.S. Department of Education’s (ED) Office for Civil Rights

This post was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes and Kaylee E. Feick.

Last November, we reported that Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill No. 2337 (“AB 2337”) into law.  AB 2337 amended Labor Code section 230.1 (“Section 230.1”) to require employers to provide written notice to employees regarding the rights of victims of domestic violence, sexual