Password.jpgGovernor Jerry Brown last week signed two new privacy laws that will go into effect January 1, 2013.  AB 1844 and SB 1349 prohibit employers, colleges and universities from requiring or asking prospective and current employees and students to disclose social media usernames and passwords.  It also prohibits requiring or requesting employees and students to

Facebook_small.jpgMaryland recently became the first in the nation to ban employers from asking job applicants and employees for their Facebook and other social media passwords.  The law was signed into legislation by Maryland’s Governor approximately one year after the ACLU took on the case of Robert Collins who claimed he was forced to turn over

CourtHouse2_Small.jpgSeveral types of First Amendment cases have taken center stage this year, as free speech lawsuits by public employees continue to proliferate.  This post addresses three areas that qualify as “hot topics.”

1. Pressing “Like” on Facebook:  Courts continue to struggle with how to address public employee claims for free speech retaliation based on

Employee Computer.JPGThere is no getting around it anymore: your employees are on Facebook.  Recent statistics from Facebook’s website state that it has over 800 million users.  It is time for all employers to know the rules surrounding employee use of social media. 

For purposes of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), social media is described as

This post was co-authored by Elizabeth Arce

Social-media-icons.pngIt seems that every time you turn on the news some new technological innovation is being announced.  For example, recent weeks have seen the unveiling of new tablet computers and smartphones.  In addition, social media platforms such as Facebook and LinkedIn are constantly announcing upgrades to their

Facebook_icon.pngAs the summer draws to an end, parents and students are beginning to prepare for the start of the school year.  For many parents, sending their children off to school can be both a joyous and fearful occasion.  The worry experienced by parents is fueled, in part, by news headlines of teachers having inappropriate sexual

Social networking websites have become a treasure trove for lawyers looking for damaging information that could be used to impeach an opposing party or any adverse witnesses in a lawsuit.  As a result, the New York Bar Association’s Committee on Professional Ethics looked into the following question:

May a lawyer view and access the Facebook