La_city_hwysFans of the late night television show Saturday Night Live probably have seen the recurring sketch called, “The Californians.”  “The Californians” is a soap opera, and the characters portray Californian stereotypes, such as poking fun at the way Californians speak and drive and their obsession over traffic.  One of the recurring jokes is that Californians

January 1, 2018, is just around the corner, and as of that date PERS contracting agencies, as well as employers in ‘37 Act county retirement systems, will for the first time have the legal ability to impose increases to the member contribution rate of their classic employees.

The Public Employee Pension Reform Act of 2013

Beach background with towel and flip flops and the word Retirement written in sand (studio shot - directional light and warm color are intentional).

On December 20, 2016, the California Court of Appeal for the Third Appellate District reaffirmed the purpose and spirit of the Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act (“PEPRA”) as a law designed to “limit,” rather than “shield,” public employees’ retirement compensation.  In the recent case, San Joaquin County Correctional Officers Association v. County of San Joaquin

Retirement-Sign.jpgThis post was authored by Heather Coffman

We’ve all heard the saying, “If it’s not written down, it didn’t happen.”  In the context of retirement benefits for PERS members, the saying is slightly modified: “If an employee’s salary isn’t set forth on a properly adopted salary schedule, that individual’s retirement benefits may not pay out

Retirement-Sign.jpgThis blog post was authored by Erin Kunze

As the summer season winds down, so do public agency departments that hire seasonal workers to staff summer camps, pools, extended park and recreation hours, and a myriad of season-specific facilities and activities. But, just how do seasonal workers impact the agency’s health and retirement benefit obligations?

Retirement-Sign.jpgThis post was authored by Erin Kunze

In the past few years, the courts have made it more difficult to establish a vested right to retiree medical benefits. We now have a decision that greatly reduces employee / retiree defenses that a change in benefits is unconstitutional.  The First District Court of Appeal last week

age_discriminationFrequently, in a lawsuit, a defendant will use a procedural device known as a motion for summary judgment to dismiss either the entire lawsuit or certain claims from the case.  The motion for summary judgment is an invaluable tool because, where successful, it precludes a lawsuit from reaching a jury.  A recent Ninth Circuit Court

Retirement-Sign.jpgThis blog post was authored by Heather DeBlanc

As employers begin to prepare for the Affordable Care Act’s (“ACA”) Employer Mandate scheduled to take effect January 1, 2015, two main questions arise relating to retired employees who return to work:

Can retired employees subject the employer to a penalty? – Yes!

Should employers offer health

Retirement Sign.jpgThis blog post was authored by Michael Youril

If your agency is a contracting agency with the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), chances are you have heard about the important distinctions between an “employee” and an “independent contractor” under the Public Employees’ Retirement Law (PERL).  Whether an individual is an “employee” or an “independent