This post was authored by David Urban

Cities, counties, special districts, public educators, and other government entities who invite public comment and contribution on their Twitter accounts, Facebook pages, websites, or other spaces on the internet might face liability for violating the First Amendment if they remove content posted by members of the public

Blue Collar Worker.jpgLast month, the National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency overseeing private sector labor relations, issued its much anticipated decision in Karl Knauz Motors, Inc dba Knauz BMW and Robert Becker (“Knauz BMW”).  The Board held that the BMW dealership’s “courtesy” rule, which among other things prohibited employees from making remarks that were

Password.jpgGovernor Jerry Brown last week signed two new privacy laws that will go into effect January 1, 2013.  AB 1844 and SB 1349 prohibit employers, colleges and universities from requiring or asking prospective and current employees and students to disclose social media usernames and passwords.  It also prohibits requiring or requesting employees and students to

Facebook_small.jpgMaryland recently became the first in the nation to ban employers from asking job applicants and employees for their Facebook and other social media passwords.  The law was signed into legislation by Maryland’s Governor approximately one year after the ACLU took on the case of Robert Collins who claimed he was forced to turn over

Employee Computer.JPGThere is no getting around it anymore: your employees are on Facebook.  Recent statistics from Facebook’s website state that it has over 800 million users.  It is time for all employers to know the rules surrounding employee use of social media. 

For purposes of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), social media is described as

Facebook.jpgIn August we reported on a new Missouri law that regulated communications between teachers and students on social media websites.  We also reported on the Missouri State Teachers Association’s (“MSTA”) successful efforts to block this so-called “Facebook Law” by obtaining a preliminary injunction from a Missouri Court.  Now, Missouri’s Legislature has voted to repeal the

This post was co-authored by Elizabeth Arce

Social-media-icons.pngIt seems that every time you turn on the news some new technological innovation is being announced.  For example, recent weeks have seen the unveiling of new tablet computers and smartphones.  In addition, social media platforms such as Facebook and LinkedIn are constantly announcing upgrades to their

Facebook_icon.pngAs the summer draws to an end, parents and students are beginning to prepare for the start of the school year.  For many parents, sending their children off to school can be both a joyous and fearful occasion.  The worry experienced by parents is fueled, in part, by news headlines of teachers having inappropriate sexual