This blog was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes.

The manner in which institutions of higher education must address sexual assault in the educational context continues to evolve as both the federal government and courts weigh in on what procedures public and private colleges and universities must follow in order to comply with both Title IX

This post was authored by Alysha Stein-Manes and Jenny Denny

On October 15, 2017 Governor Brown vetoed Senate Bill (SB) 169, a bill that would have codified into state law federal Title IX regulations and recently-repealed guidance on sexual assault and sexual violence issued by the U.S. Department of Education’s (ED) Office for Civil Rights

This post was authored by Laura Schulkind and Jenny Denny

On September 7, 2017, United States Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos spoke at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School to discuss problems with the current Title IX enforcement system and identified the need to establish a regulatory framework that better serves all students.

BACKDROP

786x496@100dpi - 6In December 2016, shortly after the November 8 presidential election, members of the California Legislature introduced for consideration a series of bills addressing immigration enforcement. Within the series, three bills would place limitations on a public agency’s ability to participate in federal immigration enforcement efforts and collect personal information regarding an individual’s religion, national origin

College-campus-from-aboveOne of the most contentious issues in higher education continues to be how to punish and deter student-to-student sexual assault, protect students and assault survivors, and at the same time fully honor the legal rights of all concerned.  Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits institutions of higher education from discriminating “on the

Breaking NewsThis post was authored by Kristin D. Lindgren

Background

On June 10, 2014, Liebert Cassidy Whitmore reported on the Superior Court decision in Vergara v. State of California.  The plaintiffs had alleged that teacher tenure, dismissal and layoff statutes found in the California Education Code unconstitutionally harmed students in two groups: (1) a general

US Supreme CourtAn unprecedented number of protests – at educational institutions and in city streets – occurred nationwide last year, and protests continue to serve as focal points for public attention and debate going into 2016.  The legal realm concerning free speech is in a similar state of turbulence for public employers and for educators.

Here are

AnotherGavel.jpgThis post was authored by Liara Silva and Alysha Stein-Manes

Last month, the California Court of Appeal issued a decision in Caldecott v. Superior Court (2015), finding that the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (“District”) was obligated under the California Public Records Act (“PRA”) to release certain documents related to an employee’s hostile work environment

Breaking-News1.jpgLast week, President Obama signed the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (“ESSA” or the “Act”) into law.  The Act reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (“ESEA”).  A bipartisan compromise bill, ESSA supersedes the controversial No Child Left Behind Act (“NCLB”).  ESSA effectively replaces NCLB’s federal-centric, one-size-fits-all model of K-12 education reform and

college-campus.jpgOver the past several years, mainstream media has become increasingly fixated on issues of sexual violence on college campuses, with major state universities like the University of Montana, Michigan State University, the University of Virginia (UVA), and the University of California at San Diego receiving the brunt of the attention and corresponding criticism.  The