This year saw perhaps the largest public protests in American history, one of the most contentious election years, vast public use of social media to achieve political and social goals, and harsh debate on whether government mandates designed to combat the pandemic infringe constitutional rights, including the right to free expression.  Free speech challenges rose

US Supreme CourtAn unprecedented number of protests – at educational institutions and in city streets – occurred nationwide last year, and protests continue to serve as focal points for public attention and debate going into 2016.  The legal realm concerning free speech is in a similar state of turbulence for public employers and for educators.

Here are

globeTuesday’s post discussed four important issues in First Amendment law which will involve the Supreme Court and other courts deciding fairly traditional, “earth bound” questions of free speech.  Today’s post explores more unusual challenges facing the courts in 2015.

1. Individuals’ Speech on Facebook:

Does the First Amendment protect an individual who makes menacing and

constitution_against_flagPart I

The year 2015 will likely be a stand-out year for new developments in First Amendment law.  The end of this year has seen free speech at the top of the news on a near-daily basis.  Protests of police department practices, sparked by events in Ferguson, Missouri and New York City, swept the country