Photo of Paul D. Knothe

Paul Knothe is an associate in Liebert Cassidy Whitmore's Los Angeles office.  Paul advises and represents clients in the areas of employment law and labor relations.  Paul has extensive experience in handling employment litigation, grievance arbitrations, administrative hearings, and providing day-to-day legal counsel to clients.

Paul's litigation practice includes matters in state and federal courts, including appellate courts pertaining to alleged discrimination and retaliation, wage-hour issues, and issues surrounding collectively bargained Memoranda of Understanding; handling all aspects of litigation, from case assessment and pre-trial motion practice, through all forms of discovery proceedings, and settlement, to trial.  Paul has litigated both class-action and single or multi-plaintiff employment matters.

Paul also regularly conducts thorough workplace investigations, with a focus on high-profile incidents or allegations against senior management personnel.

Prior to joining LCW, Paul practiced labor and employment law in both the public and private sectors.

SheriffIn Stanislaus County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association v. County of Stanislaus, decided August 11, 2016, the California Court of Appeal, Fifth Appellate District, held that custodial deputies may lawfully carry concealed firearms while off duty without obtaining a CCW permit, and invalidated the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s policy of requiring all such custodial deputies to obtain

Fire-Helmet.jpgRecently, the California Court of Appeal published its first case interpreting the unique provision of the Firefighters Procedural Bill of Rights Act (FBOR) limiting the statute’s procedural employee protections “to the events and circumstance involving the performance of official duties.”  Although the clarification is welcome, it is limited.

In Seibert v. City of San Jose

Police-Car.jpgLaw enforcement agencies’ policies, in accordance with U.S. Supreme Court precedent, uniformly require that force used by officers be objectively reasonable under the circumstances.  When considering disciplining an officer for violating a use of force policy, it is therefore critical to understand what the courts consider unreasonable.  This is a nuanced and fact-intensive analysis.  The

Antonin_Scalia_Official_SCOTUS_PortraitU.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died at the age of 79 on Saturday, February 13, 2016.  Known for his sharp turns of phrase and his conservative viewpoint, Justice Scalia was frequently controversial.  His jurisprudence over 30 years on the Court shaped much of American life, and public sector employment was no exception.  This blog

new-years-eve-1058678_960_720Everyone has favorite New Year’s traditions:  Champagne toasts, the Rose Parade, Ryan Seacrest, resolutions that may or may not last into February . . . the list goes on.

California employers should add another New Year’s ritual: learning the new laws that become effective New Year’s Day.  This post highlights some of the new statues

Breaking-News1.jpgOn October 13, 2015, California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris issued a Published Opinion, No. 12-401, relevant to a law enforcement agency’s dual responsibilities to comply with Brady v. Maryland and California’s Pitchess statutes in the wake of the California Supreme Court’s recent decision in People v. Superior Court (Johnson).  The Attorney General approved, over