The past two years have challenged employers’ resilience and adaptability in our rapidly-changing workplaces.  One such change was the explosion of remote work, which swept across workplaces throughout the country and in some cases, landed a permanent position at the hiring table.  As employers adapt to the increasing prevalence of remote work, one important question

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many employers allowed some of their employees to work from home (i.e., “telecommute” or “telework”) in the interest of public health.  We are now entering our tenth month of the pandemic, and working from home has become “the new normal” for many employers and employees.  Now, as vaccines

Many of us have been working from home longer than we ever could have anticipated when shelter-in-place orders were rolled out in March 2020.  As we’ve tried to settle into these going-on-five months of remote work, there is always room for improvement as to our work settings.  As we ease into accepting this as “normal”

Businesswoman on Videoconference with BusinessmanThis was the very question the U.S. Court of Appeals in Ohio was asked to consider in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Ford Motor Company.  The issue in this case is whether a telecommuting arrangement could be a reasonable accommodation for an employee suffering from a debilitating disability.  In a 2-1 split opinion, the