Telecommuting is a wonderful tool. Employees with compatible jobs can work from any location with an internet connection. They gain flexibility through ease of access. Telecommuting can reduce turnover and absenteeism, and modern technology has made remote work increasingly reliable. Yet, like any tool, telecommuting may cause issues if employers do not handle it competently.

On June 8, 2022, the California Department of Public Health (“CDPH”) adopted new definitions for two terms that are critical to determining how employers must respond to COVID-19 cases in the workplace: “close contact” and “infectious period.”[1]

The updated definitions will affect employer obligations under both CDPH health orders that use such terms and

This post originally appeared in January 2022.

In light of the current surge in COVID-19 cases, it is important that employers understand their obligations in the event that there is a COVID-19 outbreak at one of their workplaces.

This blog post is intended to provide an overview of the various statutory and regulatory obligations

Non-employees may be able to sue employers for COVID-19 infections that can be traced to the employer’s workplace. A recent California Court of Appeal decision may pave the way for third parties to collect compensation from employers due to COVID-19 infections.

A California Court of Appeal recently allowed a cause of action brought by an

In light of the current surge in COVID-19 cases, it is important that employers understand their obligations in the event that there is a COVID-19 outbreak at one of their workplaces.

This blog post is intended to provide an overview of the various statutory and regulatory obligations that employers have during an outbreak so that

Since the COVID-19 pandemic first began, it has had a multitude of evolving impacts on the operation of the workplace.  One impact is the increased number of requests employers are receiving from employees for reasonable accommodations.  These increases are attributed to various factors, which have evolved as the pandemic has progressed.  At the outset of

Under updated guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health (“CDPH”),[1] certain asymptomatic unvaccinated employees who have had a close contact exposure[2] to someone with COVID-19 may end their quarantine and return to work seven (7) days after the exposure as opposed to ten (10) days.

The CDPH guidance provides that

Over the last several months, mandatory vaccination requirements took center stage in the public response to COVID-19, but with the play getting underway and vaccination requirements becoming operative, it is the request for religious accommodation (i.e., exemption from vaccination requirements) that may be stealing the show.

Title VII and FEHA Set the Stage