On October 18, 2017, the California Supreme Court denied review of Santa Ana Police Officers Association, et al. v. City of Santa Ana et al., a decision from the Fourth District Court of Appeal involving information (sometimes referred to as “discovery”) that must be provided to a law enforcement officer in connection with a disciplinary

A California Court of Appeal recently found that the City and County of San Francisco’s disciplinary procedure for police officers is not compliant with the Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights Act (“POBRA”), which requires that all California law enforcement agencies provide officers with certain minimum procedural rights.  In Morgado v. City and County

786x496@100dpi - 6In December 2016, shortly after the November 8 presidential election, members of the California Legislature introduced for consideration a series of bills addressing immigration enforcement. Within the series, three bills would place limitations on a public agency’s ability to participate in federal immigration enforcement efforts and collect personal information regarding an individual’s religion, national origin

Police-Cars.jpgThis post was authored by Jennifer Rosner

In a recent decision by a California Court of Appeal, a Court held that it was not unreasonable for the City of Los Angeles to assign temporarily injured recruit officers to light-duty administrative assignments in light of the City’s past policy and practice of doing so.

Plaintiffs were

Fire JacketIn 2007, the Firefighters Procedural Bill of Rights Act (FBOR) was enacted after several years of unsuccessful attempts to pass similar legislation. Although the FBOR is modeled after the longstanding Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights Act (POBR) [Gov. Code, §§ 3300 et seq.], that statutory scheme, which was originally intended for peace officers,

SheriffIn Stanislaus County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association v. County of Stanislaus, decided August 11, 2016, the California Court of Appeal, Fifth Appellate District, held that custodial deputies may lawfully carry concealed firearms while off duty without obtaining a CCW permit, and invalidated the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s policy of requiring all such custodial deputies to obtain

Fire-Helmet.jpgRecently, the California Court of Appeal published its first case interpreting the unique provision of the Firefighters Procedural Bill of Rights Act (FBOR) limiting the statute’s procedural employee protections “to the events and circumstance involving the performance of official duties.”  Although the clarification is welcome, it is limited.

In Seibert v. City of San Jose

Police-Car.jpgLaw enforcement agencies’ policies, in accordance with U.S. Supreme Court precedent, uniformly require that force used by officers be objectively reasonable under the circumstances.  When considering disciplining an officer for violating a use of force policy, it is therefore critical to understand what the courts consider unreasonable.  This is a nuanced and fact-intensive analysis.  The

Breaking-News1.jpgThis post was authored by Laura Kalty and Danny Yoo.

The Court of Appeal issued its decision in Ellins v. City of Sierra Madre,[1] which provides public agencies with guidance on when to disclose the nature of an investigation prior to interrogating a peace officer pursuant to the Public Safety Officer Procedural